Qutub Minar Delhi

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qutub minar delhi

Qutub Minar Delhi’s pupular Minaret

The Qutub Minar (72.5 meters tall) is the world’s tallest brick minaret.

qutub minar delhi
Qutub Minar

In 2006, this complex attracted more visitors than the Taj Mahal.

qutub minar delhi
Close up of the Minaret

The Qutub Minar and the surrounding structures and ruins have been listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

qutub minar delhi
Furry Friend @ Qutub

Inspired by the Minaret of Jam in Afghanistan and wishing to surpass it, Qutbuddin Aibak, the first Muslim ruler of Delhi, commenced construction of the Qutub Minar in 1193, but could only complete its base. His successor, Iltutmish, added three more stories and, in 1386, Firuz Shah Tughluq constructed the fifth and the last story.

Quwwat-ul-Islam Mosque

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Inside Quwwat-ul-Islam Mosque

The complex initially housed 27 ancient Hindu and Jain temples, which were destroyed and their debris was used to build the Qutb Minar.

Iron Pillar

According to the local folklore, anyone who can encircle the Iron Pillar with their arms, with their back towards it, can have their wish granted.

The authorities had to build a fence around the Pillar to prevent damages to the column due to the corrosive qualities of sweat – Sticky backs in the hot Delhi summers

qutub minar delhi
Iron Pillar

Alai Minar

Alai Minar was the unfulfilled dream of Ala-ud-din. He wanted to build a tower larger and taller than the Qutub Minar, which would serve as an Victory Tower.

qutub minar delhi
Alai Minar

Iltutmish Tomb

Built by Shamsu’d-Din Iltutmish himself in 1235, the tomb lies to the northwest of the Quwwatu’l Islam Mosque. Unlike his predecessors, Iltutmish abstained from using the material obtained from the demolition of temples.

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Interior Walls

The original dome, which fell down, was replaced by Feroze Shah Tughluq. However, even the second dome did not survive for long.

qutub minar delhi
Inside the tomb

Ala-ud-din Khilji’s Tomb

Ala-ud-din Khilji was the second ruler of the Turko-Afghan Khilji dynasty in India. He was the most powerful ruler of the dynasty, reigning from 1296 to 1316.

qutub minar delhi
Ala-ud-din Khilji’s Tomb

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View from the tomb

Imam Zamin’s Tomb

Imam Zamin was a saint from Turkestan, who settled in India around 1500 AD. The tomb is a small, sandstone structure with a dome resting on an octagonal base. The interior is finished in polished white plaster, and contains fine, perforated jalis, or screens.

qutub minar delhi

Smith’s Folly

The original cupola of the Qutub Minar was damaged in an earthquake. This was replaced by a well meaning Englishman named Major Smith. However, Lord Hardinge, the Governor-general of British India, had it removed since he thought it was an eyesore. Smith’s cupola now rests on the grounds near the Minaret and has been aptly named ‘Smith’s Folly‘.

qutub minar delhi
Smith’s Folly

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@ Smith’s Folly

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View of the Qutub Minar and Imam Zamin’s Tomb from Smith’s Folly

Sanderson’s Sundial

qutub minar delhi
Sanderson’s Sundial

Timings: 6 AM to 6 PM (Open all days)

How to get here :

Air :
There are plenty of cheap flights to Delhi.
Train :
New Delhi railway station is the second busiest and one of the largest in India. Most eastbound and northbound trains originate/end at New Delhi Railway Station.

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3 Responses to Qutub Minar Delhi

  1. k govind prasad March 28, 2010 at 6:32 am #

    hi
    30 years back i could climb all the 4 levels of qutub minar. at this level the sight of delhi in 360 deg panoramic view was simply fantastic. then people started using these floors for committing sucide and promply goverment allowed visitors only up to 1 st level. i climbed to this level, may be 15 years back. then one day in a stampede in the spiral staircase, many school children perished. and the government took the easy way out and promptly locked the main gate. i visited this place an year back and really missed the view.
    govinda prasad

    • Savi March 29, 2010 at 8:13 pm #

      Yeah, it would have been really nice to climb the Minar. But given how crowded the place is, I can imagine how hard it must be to control the crowds – better safe than sorry! You were lucky to have had the chance to climb the minar.

  2. Mahesh Semwal March 17, 2014 at 11:00 pm #

    every day I use to cross thru it while going and coming back from my office.

    Thanks for sharing ur experience

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